How Long Could a Cars Starter Motor Run If Directly Connected to the Battery?

like countless different guy suggested, attempt tapping on the starter some situations with a hammer, that is caught, ive seen that ensue until eventually now, or the solenoid isnt kicking the starter in

1. The starter motor in a car draws 250.0 A of current from the 12.0-V battery for 0.70 s.?

Theoretical physics interior the motor vehicle restore section? Hmm. There are a pair of assumptions outfitted in to this question, and particularly some beside the point textile. Assumption a million: a single electron follows the completed twine course from the battery via to floor. you could no longer answer that for the time of meters given which you do not know the size of the windings. Electrons shifting on the fee of light have a lot of time to make the completed circuit. Assumption 2: A single electron follows the completed twine course from the battery in the process the windings and back to the neg terminal on the battery. lower back, you could no longer answer that, you do not know the size of the windings or the return course (floor is in the process the engine block and floor strap). Assumption 3: No single electron makes the completed circuit. relatively, each and each electron strikes an exceedingly short (microns) distance, and displaces an electron interior the molecules it encounters there. you in all probability have the information to respond to this in a textbook, i do no longer

2. Occasionally starter will turn engine over very slowly. Dying starter motor?

With these problems always start by taking the battery back to where you bought it and have it tested. Before reinstalling the battery go down to the starter tighten the electrical connections and starter mounting bolts. A previous responder alluded to the fact that poor connections tend to get hot when large currents flow thru them. A new starter will spin the motor faster using less current saving wear and tear on the alternator

3. Here's What to Check for Before Buying a Used Car

Check Engine Light: The first and most obvious thing to watch for before buying a used car is the check engine light (CEL). If there's a detected problem, this light typically appears on the gauge cluster. The problem can be minor or severe, ranging from a loose fuel cap to a failed catalytic converter. Whatever it is, it should never be ignored. You can use an OBD-II scanner to diagnose the problem, which will produce an OBD-II code you can then research to identify the specific problem. Squealing and Erratic Noises: Start the car and listen for squealing noises, which may indicate a worn serpentine belt or belt tensioner. Rubber belts tend to wear out in older cars and should be replaced to prevent additional damage. Erratic engine noises may be caused by a vacuum leak, dirty airflow sensor, faulty fuel injectors, or worn spark plugs. Colored Exhaust Smoke: Walk to the back and check the exhaust for smoke. White smoke may be caused by a blown head gasket or coolant mixed with oil, which can appear "milky." Blue smoke may be caused by burning oil, possibly from worn piston rings or valve guides. If you see black smoke, the car may be "running rich" and receiving too much fuel. This may be caused by a faulty O2 or air flow sensor. Clunky Shifting: Ready to take a test drive? Pay attention when shifting from park to drive or to any gear with a manual transmission. If the shift feels unusually clunky, the vehicle may need new transmission fluid. In more serious situations, a transmission repair may be needed. And that can be costly. Humming or Droning: Once you are on the road and traveling at speed, listen for excessive humming or droning when driving straight or through corners. If you hear anything, inspect the tires for cracks and uneven wear. You should also check the manufacturing date, in case the tire is several years old. If the noise disappears when turning left or right, you may be dealing with a worn wheel bearing. High-Pitched Whine: Some cars get noisier as the years and miles pile on, but a high-pitched whine under acceleration or engine load should not be ignored. This sound could be due to worn bearings within the transmission or differential, or the vehicle could just need its transmission fluid flushed. Mushy Brake Pedal: If the brake pedal feels unusually mushy when you are coming to a stop, the brake fluid may be dirty and need to be changed. You may also want to check the brake lines, which carry fluid from the master cylinder into the brake calipers. These lines are typically made from rubber, which can develop cracks over time. Brake Judder: During your test drive, try applying the brakes with varying pressure. If you feel vibrations from the brake pedal or steering wheel, you may be experiencing brake judder. This is typically caused by the rotors, which may be misaligned or warped from overheating. These vibrations can range from mild to strong, potentially leading to dangerous situations. Grinding Metal Sound: The sound of grinding metal is typically caused by worn brake pads. Each time you apply the brakes, a small amount of the brake pad wears off. Over time, the pad material will wear away to the point of requiring replacement. Off-Center Steering: A car that's driven many miles or gotten into an accident may have its alignment knocked out of balance. This can cause the steering wheel to be off-center when driving in a straight line, causing the car to pull to the left or right on its own. A misaligned vehicle may be unsafe to drive and can also be less fuel efficient, so do not overlook this one. Bouncy Ride: Every car is fitted with shock absorbers that help soak up bumps and rough surfaces. If the ride feels overly bouncy in these conditions, it's likely that the shocks are worn and need to be replaced. Pay extra attention to high-mileage vehicles. As the shocks get more use, the seals may wear out and leak fluid. Popping Noise While Turning: Do you hear popping or clunking noises while turning the wheel? There's a good chance it's coming from the vehicle's suspension. The suspension ball joints may be worn out. As suspension components wear out with mileage, the noises tend to get louder over time. On all-wheel drive and front-wheel drive vehicles, popping noises while turning can also be a symptom of torn boots at the axle joints (often referred to as CV boots). Faulty Lights: It's smart to inspect a used car during the day, but do not forget to check all the lights. This includes headlights, high beams, and taillights. These components can be costly to replace, especially if you need a new light assembly. You may want to ask the owner to operate each light while you examine the vehicle outside. Unresponsive Buttons and More: Modern cars come with plenty of features, and it's important to ensure that they all work correctly. From the air conditioning to the stereo, leave no button unpressed. This is especially important for vehicles with premium amenities and technology, such as heated seats and a touchscreen infotainment system. Hard Starting Problems: If you've ever seen an action movie, you know how important it is to have a car that starts reliably. After taking your test drive, shut off the car and restart the engine to ensure that it starts back up without issues. Any problems here may be related to the charging system, which includes the battery, starter motor, and alternator. Whether it's new or used, buying a car is a big decision. If you need a second opinion, do not be afraid to ask for help. Consider bringing a friend who knows their way around cars. You can also take the car to an independent mechanic or get it inspected at a franchise dealership, which may have factory-trained technicians. These services usually require a small fee but can pay dividends during ownership.

get in touch with us
추천 기사
Is This Bad Starter Motor?
Sounds more like a connection problem or bad battery. Even if the starter was bad and the connections and battery were in good shape the voltage would not drop below 8 volts. Check for poor connection at the battery (both the positive and negative cables) The battery when charged up should show a static charge of 12.7 volts Hope this helps1. how does an induction motor work?The simplest of all electric motors is the squirrel-cage type of induction motor used with a three-phase supply. The armature of the squirrel-cage motor consists of three fixed coils similar to the armature of the synchronous motor. The rotating member consists of a core in which are imbedded a series of heavy conductors arranged in a circle around the shaft and parallel to it. With the core removed, the rotor conductors resemble in form the cylindrical cages once used to exercise pet squirrels. The three-phase current flowing in the stationary armature windings generates a rotating magnetic field, and this field induces a current in the conductors of the cage. The magnetic reaction between the rotating field and the current-carrying conductors of the rotor makes the rotor turn. If the rotor is revolving at exactly the same speed as the magnetic field, no currents will be induced in it, and hence the rotor should not turn at a synchronous speed. In operation the speeds of rotation of the rotor and the field differ by about 2 to 5 percent. This speed difference is known as slip. Motors with squirrel-cage rotors can be used on single-phase alternating current by means of various arrangements of inductance and capacitance that alter the characteristics of the single-phase voltage and make it resemble a two-phase voltage. Such motors are called split-phase motors or condenser motors (or capacitor motors), depending on the arrangement used. Single-phase squirrel-cage motors do not have a large starting torque, and for applications where such torque is required, repulsion-induction motors are used. A repulsion-induction motor may be of the split-phase or condenser type, but has a manual or automatic switch that allows current to flow between brushes on the commutator when the motor is starting, and short-circuits all commutator segments after the motor reaches a critical speed. Repulsion-induction motors are so named because their starting torque depends on the repulsion between the rotor and the stator, and their torque while running depends on induction. Series-wound motors with commutators, which will operate on direct or alternating current, are called universal motors. They are usually made only in small sizes and are commonly used in household appliances.2. is it bad to have a car with a lot of miles but new motor?well you got the tranny. that can go at any time. but if it is good then you will only have the odds and ends3. How does an AC motor work?Basically, an AC motor is a type of motor that is operated by an alternating current. It has two basic parts. First is a stationary stator and another is rotor.The above diagram shows the configuration of stator winding. I am giving an example for 3 phase motor. Hence, in above diagram A, B and C are the three phases. When the current is supplied to the windings, all the three windings become electromagnets. When the current reverses polarity of the winding also reverses.The stator windings are 120 degrees apart. Now, when the supply is given to the windings, only 2 phases of the supply are active and the remaining one phase is non-active or has no current flowing through it. Hence, the one phase which has no current flowing through it will have no magnetic field.Let us assume that at the start phase A has no current and no magnetic field produced. Phase B has current in negative direction and phase C has current in positive direction. Now, at some time 1, phase A has current in positive direction and phase B has in negative direction. While phase C has no current and no magnetic field. The resultant magnetic field vector has rotated 60 in the clockwise direction. Now at some time 2, phase A has current in positive direction and phase C has in negative direction while phase B has no current and magnetic field. The resultant magnetic field vector has rotated another 60.Now, after the end of 6 such cycles, the resultant magnetic filed vector would have rotated 360 or one full rotation. This is known as the Rotating Magnetic Field.Now, According to Faraday's law of induction,An emf induced in any circuit is due to the rate of change of magnetic flux linkage through the circuit.As the rotor winding in an induction motor or AC motor are either closed through an external resistance or directly shorted by end ring, and cut the stator rotating magnetic field, an emf is induced in the rotor copper bar and due to this emf a current flows through the rotor conductor. Here the relative speed between the rotating flux and static rotor conductor is the cause of current generation.As per Lenz's law,The rotor will rotate in the same direction to reduce the cause i.e. the relative velocity.The rotor speed should not reach the synchronous speed produced by the stator. If the speeds equals, there would be no such relative speed, so no emf induced in the rotor, and no current would be flowing, and therefore no torque would be generated. Consequently the rotor can not reach the synchronous speed. The difference between the stator (synchronous speed) and rotor speeds is called the slip. The rotation of the magnetic field in an induction motor has the advantage that no electrical connections need to be made to the rotor.where Ns is the Synchronous speed and Nr is the Rotor speed.THANK YOU FOR READING.Ashutosh Sharma ( )How does an AC motor work?.
How Do I Remove the Starter Motor From a 1956 Y-block 292 V8 Engine?
I Have a 12V Starter Motor That Needs Extra Help at Times.
Is It Easy to Remove Starter Motor for 2001 Oldsmobile?
My Holidays: Scott Miller, CEO of Volunteering NZ
Starter Motor Service, Repair and Replacement
How Does a Starter Solenoid on a Lawn Mower Work?
Whats a Good Starter Motorcycle for a Girl?
Why Do Electric Car Motors Have Constant Torque?
Sometimes My Ignition in My Truck Will Not Engage Immediately, Could It Be the Starter Motor?
related searches
How Do I Remove the Starter Motor From a 1956 Y-block 292 V8 Engine?
I Have a 12V Starter Motor That Needs Extra Help at Times.
Is It Easy to Remove Starter Motor for 2001 Oldsmobile?
My Holidays: Scott Miller, CEO of Volunteering NZ
How Does a Starter Solenoid on a Lawn Mower Work?
Why Do Electric Car Motors Have Constant Torque?
Sometimes My Ignition in My Truck Will Not Engage Immediately, Could It Be the Starter Motor?
My Holidays: Scott Miller, CEO of Volunteering NZ
I Have a 12V Starter Motor That Needs Extra Help at Times.

Copyright © 2020  Shandong Abusair Agricultural Machinery Co,. Ltd- |  Sitemap

Multifunctional farm Abusair machinery  |  Tea Professional Cultivator farm machinery